Commercial Range: Everything You Need To Know

How to Choose a Range, Cook Fast, Efficiently, and Precisely; Eliminate Downtime; and Maintain a Safe Kitchen and a Sparkling Clean Range, and maybe even fix your range when it breaks.

Highlights:

Table of Contents:

Commercial Range Glossary:

Commercial Range: A commercial range is a piece of cooking equipment that includes separate areas that cook using gas, electricity, or induction. It consists of a range top and a range base.

Rangetop: A commercial rangetop is the top part of the range. It has different zones that heat up for cooking. A commercial rangetop can have burner grates or a flat smooth surface. A range top can include open burners, griddles, charbroilers, or other configurations.

Griddle: A griddle is a flat surface that you can cook food directly on. They can be grooved but are normally flat. They are often made out of steel.

Charbroiler: A charbroiler is made up of grates or grills. You can cook food directly on a charbroiler. Flames reach the food through the grates. Heat can be intense and direct.

Plancha: A plancha is a flattop grill. You cook directly on top of a plancha. It looks similar to a griddle accept its heating source is circular instead of straight. The middle is the hottest area of the plancha and the outer edges are the coolest.

Range Base: The range base is the part of the range below the range top. It can consist of different things depending on what is wanted. It can consist of ovens, space saver ovens, cabinets, or refrigeration.

Oven: An oven is a closed compartment or chamber used to cook, bake, heat, or roast food. The oven would be placed below the rangetop. Here are the different types of ovens:

  1. Standard Oven: It is also called a conventional oven. It comes with 2 functions to heat food. To bake food you turn the oven on and the oven produces heat from the bottom of the oven. To broil food, if your oven is equipped for such, you turn on the broiler and a flame appears inside at the top of the oven.
  2. Convection Oven: A convection oven is like a standard oven except it has a fan inside of it. The fan in the oven is there to keep the air evenly circulating so that the item in the oven cooks evenly.
  3. Space Saver Oven: A space saver oven is simply a narrower version of a standard oven.

Cabinet Base: Instead of adding an oven underneath the rangetop, a storage cabinet can be used as a base instead.

Refrigerator Base: Refrigerators come in different sizes. There are refrigeration options for the bases of commercial ranges.

Salamander: A salamander, also known as a salamander broiler, is a self-contained broiler unit. The salamander is used to broil meats like fish and steaks, and for other intense-heat cooking. The heat comes from the top of the salamander to cook the top of the dish.

Commercial Cheesemelter: A cheesemelter is a type of broiler equipment. Cheesemelters use either an open element or direct flame. You can fine-tune the heat of a cheesemelter.

Commercial Range Nameplate: A nameplate on a commercial range is a tag connected to the range that provides information about the range manufacturer’s name and contact info, details about your range, and specifications for the operation of the range. Commercial range nameplates are sometimes metal.

Commercial Range Hood: Also known as an exhaust hood, a range hood is a piece of equipment with a fan that is installed above a range or other kitchen appliance. A hood is there to remove the heat, odiferous air, products of combustion, steam, grease that gets into the air, gas, fumes, and smoke.

Commercial Ranges

6-Burner Range w French Top

Thank you Wikimedia.org for the use of this image.

What is a Commercial Range?

A commercial range is a piece of cooking equipment that includes separate areas that cook using gas, electricity, or induction.

A range is the combination of a rangetop and a base. The rangetop is what people think of as a stove. A rangetop can be configured in a variety of different ways to cook food with burner grates, griddles, hot tops, charbroilers, or other accessories. The range base is many times a type of oven but can also be a refrigerator or storage cupboards.

Many times, the term stove and range are used interchangeably. Most manufacturers call stoves "rangetops" and the combination of stoves on top of ovens "ranges." Someone working in a kitchen environment, or in the repair service industry, may also refer to ranges as stoves.

The individual areas that heat up on a range are called burners. A burner is used to heat up cookware. These burners can be flat, closed surfaces or raised, open-flame surfaces. Burners can heat via gas, electricity, or induction.

Companies, such as Garland and Vulcan, and American Range provide commercial ranges in heavy-duty and restaurant grade.

When to Pull the Trigger on a Heavy Duty Range

Commercial Range Grades

Commercial ranges come in two different grades. There are restaurant grade commercial ranges and heavy-duty commercial ranges.

10-Burner Range w 2 Ovens

Appreciative acknowledgment to C1 and StaticFlickr.com for the use of their photo.

Restaurant Grade Commercial Range:

Also known as mid-size commercial ranges, restaurant ranges are best-suited for smaller restaurants. These restaurants would normally have less than 150 seats. Many times they can be found in church kitchens, shelter kitchens, schools, and mom and pop diners.

Heavy Duty Grade Commercial Range:

Heavy-duty commercial ranges can withstand more use, offer more heat power, and front gas manifolds that allow for batterying of equipment. It is recommended that they be purchased for restaurants that have more than 150 seats. These are more suitable for large facilities like correctional facilities, hospitals, cafeterias that are producing many meals in a day, and big restaurants.

Michael R. Amandoli, the president of Food Equipment Repair Service Inc., reported that most people choose a range on price. He recommends that instead, people should buy a commercial range based off of how busy their business is. If a business is extremely busy and the commercial range is being used all day long, Amandoli cautions to not get a medium-duty (restaurant grade) range. He said that medium-duty ranges belong in establishments like churches where they are used every weekend, not every day, all day. If the range will be used every day, all day, business owners need a more expensive, heavy-duty range. He said that, if you are an all day chef, the most important thing you can do is get a heavy-duty range. Amandoli went on to say that a business owner should keep in mind good strong manufacturers that stand up to their warranty. He believes Vulcan is very strong for this.

Heat Production for Commercial Ranges

In order to cook food we need a heat supply. Commercial ranges have two main methods of supplying heat. Commercial ranges supply heat through gas and/or electricity.

How Does Gas Create Heat?

In a gas commercial range, if air and gas are combined and subsequently ignited with a flame or spark, fire is created and therefore heat is emitted.

How Does Electricity Create Heat?

If the electricity supply is on, an electrical current runs from the wall socket, through the range plug, to the wires on the inside of the coils on the range "burner." Electrical energy is then changed into thermal energy. The electricity that reached the coil heats up the metal coil.

What Types of Gas are used in Commercial Ranges?

There are two types of gas used in commercial ranges, natural gas and propane, or LP.

Natural Gas vs. Propane

Natural Gas

Weighing less than air and dispersing upward, natural gas comes to a range from a pipeline. The gas and electric company normally supplies natural gas. It comes into the building through a pipeline.

Liquid Propane

Also called LP, liquid propane weighs more than air and remains down on the floor with a gas leak. Propane is supplied to a building through a pipeline that leads to a propane tank on the property. This tank will need to be refilled.

Video on Natural Gas vs. Liquid Propane from Louis Tsalikis

How Does Gas Get to a Commercial Range?

Here is the process of how gas arrives at your commercial range burner. (This is for a pilot light ignition. There are variations of these steps when a different kind of igniter is used.)

Lighting the Pilot Light

Grateful acknowledgment to Pitco for the use of this image.

  1. Gas gets to a building through a pipe. Before entering a building the pipeline connects to the main building manual shut off valve.
  2. Gas then passes through the building pressure regulator to reduce the gas pressure before it enters the building.
  3. As the gas enters the building it can branch off. The line that goes to the kitchen will provide gas to the commercial range and other kitchen appliances.
  4. In some setups, before the gas pipeline arrives at the kitchen it will reach an electrical or mechanical kitchen shut off. This shut off hooks up to the fire safety system so that if there is a fire, the system will shut off the gas flow to the commercial range and the rest of the kitchen appliances.
  5. Once the gas line enters the kitchen, there will be another manual valve shut off switch.
  6. Just before the gas line reaches the commercial range it will pass through another pressure regulator.
  7. Next the gas line reaches the connection to the commercial range.
  8. Once gas reaches the appliance connection there is a gas valve with pipelines that branch off two ways. One branch goes to the gas line for the burners while the other pipe goes to a pilot light valve button. Off of the pilot light valve there is a pipe that leads to the actual pilot light burner.
  9. If you push down on the pilot light valve button it allows gas to flow from the gas valve to the pilot light burner.
  10. While the pilot light valve button is pushed, a flame or spark is used to ignite the gas flowing to the pilot light burner.
  11. Once the pilot light burner is lit, the thermocouple (a thing that detects heat and is attached next to the pilot light) will heat up from the pilot light flame and send an electrical signal to the gas valve connected to the burner. The thermocouple is signaling to the gas valve that the pilot light is lit with an appropriate size flame and it is safe to open up the safety valve to allow gas flow to the burner.
  12. Pilot Light and Thermocouple
  13. When the gas valve gets the signal from the thermocouple, the gas valve allows gas to flow to the burners. As the gas leaves the gas valve and heads toward the burners, it meets up with the pilot flame and ignites the gas going to the burner.

How Does Electricity Get to an Electric Range?

Here is the process of how electricity arrives at your commercial range "burner."

Many thanks to pixabay.com for the use of this photo.

Flat Surface Electric Range
  1. Electricity makes it to the building from the power company. Sometimes there are visible electrical power lines going from the electrical power pole to your main service panel. There should be a meter on this main electricity service panel. Other times the electricity does not get to a building via visible, above ground power lines and instead comes to the building from below ground.
  2. Power flows to the main breaker. The main circuit breaker will trip if there is a short circuit using more amps than the main breaker is rated to handle. The circuit breaker will also trip if it is trying to use more energy than it is rated for, even though it was not from a short circuit.
  3. Power then flows through the main breaker to the sub panel circuit breakers.
  4. Power leaves the sub panel circuit breakers and heads to the sub panels and the individual circuit breakers.
  5. These individual circuit breakers will control various things within the building including lights, and outlets used for things such as the commercial range.
  6. When the commercial range is plugged in, electricity can flow to it.
  7. If you turn the electric commercial range on, the wire inside the rangetop will get electricity. (If it is a flat electric commercial range there would be a coil below the flat rangetop surface.)
  8. As electricity flows through the coil, the electricity warms the metal coil and the coil turns orange.
  9. If the electric commercial range knob is turned to a higher setting, more electricity flows through the wire in the metal coil electric "burner" and the "burner" gets hotter.

Video on Commercial Range 9 Burner Flame from Sylhet Welding UK

Different Types of Commercial Range Ignitions

There are multiple ways to ignite a commercial range. Here are seven of the different kinds of commercial range ignitions:

Video on How a Gas Ignition Works from Dan Webster

  1. Pilot Ignition

    This is considered a gas ignition on a commercial range. There is a small pilot light that remains lit at all times. This pilot light keeps the thermocouple heated. The thermocouple signals the gas valve to open to allow gas to flow toward the burners. When you turn the burner knob, the pilot will light the burner.

  2. Spark Ignition

    A spark ignition is also called an electronic spark ignition. This is a gas ignition burner but since it also uses electricity to create a flame, it is considered an electronic ignition, as well. A spark ignition on a gas commercial range works like this: If you turn the commercial range knob it allows gas to flow out of the igniters pilot hole. This gas mixes with air. Simultaneously, when the knob is turned it also sends electricity to the igniter, making it spark. When the spark meets the gas air mixture, the gas ignites and the burner of the commercial range is now lit.

  3. Gas Burner

    Appreciative acknowledgment to Essortment for the use of their image.

  4. Hot Surface Ignition

    Hot surface ignition is also considered a gas ignition and an electronic ignition because it uses gas and an electric component to create fire. Hot surface igniters use a glow bar or coil as the igniter. A hot surface or glow bar is a component that heats (using electricity) to the ignition temperature of gas. As the glow bar reaches the correct temperature, there is a sensor that will open the gas valve. These commercial range ignitions are less common today, but are still being produced. Wolf Ranges, like the Commander Heavy-Duty Sectional Range Line, the Heavy Duty Commander Sectional Range Line with Snorkler Convection Oven, and the Heavy Duty Commander Sectional Range Line with Standard Oven are examples of commercial ranges that utilize the hot surface ignition.

  5. Induction

    Induction is short for electromagnetic induction. Induction cooking heats cookware by generating heat from electricity and magnetic forces. There is a copper coil under the cooktop. This coil is controlled by electricity. When you turn on the commercial range an alternating electrical current goes to the copper coil wrapped around an iron core and produces a fluctuating magnetic field. When you set a metal pan on top of the cooktop the iron in the pan is penetrated by the magnetic field. The magnetic field causes whirling electrical currents on the inside of your pot or pan and makes it act like a heater. Through conduction, the "heater" then warms the contents of your pot or pan.

  6. A Video on How Induction Works from Manage My Life

  7. Electronic Ignition for Raised Coil "Burners"
  8. This type of ignition takes an outlet, electricity, and the turn of a knob. When you turn the knob of the range, electrical currents flows through the outlet to the commercial range-heating element. The heating element is a wire inside of the steel "burner" coil and it is heated through resistive heating.

  9. Electronic Ignition for Flat Glass-Ceramic Ranges with Coils

    This ignition type is the same as it is for the raised coil "burners" however, in flat surface rangetops the coils are placed under the tempered glass-ceramic material. The coils radiate the heat into the glass. The glass then radiates the heat into the cookware.

  10. Electronic Ignition for Flat Glass-Ceramic Ranges Using Halogen Bulbs

    This ignition type is similar to the electronic ignition for flat glass-ceramic ranges with coils however, in these flat surface rangetops the coils are replaced with a ring of halogen bulbs. When you turn the knob of the commercial range to the on position electricity flows to the halogen bulbs beneath the flat glass rangetop. Immediately the halogen bulbs with emit infrared radiation and red light. The radiant heat travels at the speed of light into the glass cooktop and warms the glass cooktop. When you put a pot on top of the glass top, the pot will heat through a combination of radiation and conduction– through radiation via the heat from the halogen lamp hitting the pot and through conduction via the hot glass beneath the pot.

Precision Cooking Hacks: Gas vs. Electric

Pros and Cons: Gas Commercial Ranges VS. Electric Commercial Ranges

When choosing between an electric range and a gas range there are pros and cons to consider.

Natural Gas Burner

Thankful acknowledgment to 2.bp and blogspot.com for the use of this photo.

Pros of Having a Gas Range

Cons of Having a Gas Range

Pros of Having an Electric Range

Cons of Having an Electric Range

Video on Gas vs. Electric Range Top from Alabama Gas Company

Dan Matlack, senior product specialist at KaTom, added these tips when deciding to buy a gas commercial range vs. an electric commercial range, "There’s an enormous difference between the two. In most commercial settings, I’m going to recommend they go with a gas range for a lot of reasons. Gas provides immediate response to movements of the knobs, heats up much faster, creates a much more intense heat, and is cheaper in a lot of the country.

"There’s nothing wrong with commercial electric ranges, but, unless the customer has a good reason to choose one, like being in our part of the country where TVA provides electricity cheaper than they can get gas, they’re often better-off going with gas. Electric ranges have come a long way, but they’re still much slower, less responsive, and may not keep up with high-volume kitchens as well as gas.

"The preferred alternative and one we hope more people in foodservice will embrace is induction. It’s a much better answer to gas than typical electric ranges. You have more instantaneous and precise control, even compared to gas. Induction can also come to temp faster than conventional electric or gas, and it’s incredibly efficient, with almost all the power consumed going directly to cooking your food, which means you save on utilities and HVAC costs, and you cook the food, not the cook.

"In most cases, the efficiency rating of the piece is much more important than the BTU or kW output, because that tells you how well the piece converts gas or electricity into heat. Some units have high BTU or kW ratings, but they’re not very efficient at transferring that to your food because they pump a lot of that heat straight up the flue unused. There are a few cases where the output rating is important, though. For instance, stir frying demands a high-BTU, gas range.

"You have to consider how many people you want to serve in a day, both your maximum and your average. In most cases, it’s better to oversize the range to allow room to expand your menu or keep up as your turns increase. Oversizing doesn’t typically add a whole lot to the bottom line cost, and it can help you avoid big problems and save money in the long run. I also encourage most operations to go for the more heavy-duty ranges and for brands that have a better reputation. Even if you’re sticking to a budget, I would say go for a more economical model from one of the big names, so you know it should keep up with your demands and last for years."

Tips to Avoid Range Buyer's Remorse

Pros and Cons: Restaurant Grade Ranges VS. Heavy-Duty Ranges

There are multiple pros and cons to purchasing a restaurant range or a heavy-duty range.

Pros of Having a Restaurant Grade (Mid-Size) Range

  • Upfront cost is less than purchasing a heavy-duty rage
  • Less expensive cost to have a restaurant range serviced over a heavy-duty range
  • BTUs are comparable to heavy-duty specs
  • Smaller design saves room in the kitchen in comparison to the heavy-duty option
  • Can work as a freestanding model
  • Power levels are similar to heavy-duty specs

Cons of Having a Restaurant Grade (Mid-Size) Range

  • May have a little bit lower energy outputs
  • Cannot withstand years of intense use like a heavy-duty range will
  • Heavy-duty ranges are more durable
  • Can be more expensive to install

Pros of Having a Heavy-Duty Range

  • Extremely durable composition
  • Long lasting materials
  • Lesser cook times due to the higher energy outputs
  • Can connect with other units to create larger units for higher output
  • Can handle very heavy pots

Cons of Having a Heavy-Duty Range

  • The upfront cost of a heavy-duty commercial range is more than a restaurant grade commercial range
  • Heavy-duty ranges are normally larger than restaurant grade ranges so they take up more space in the kitchen
  • Service costs are more expensive on heavy-duty commercial ranges than on restaurant ranges
  • Higher energy bills due to the higher energy output

Commercial Ranges and Energy Efficiency

Energy efficient commercial equipment can help a business save money each year and help protect the environment. There are some commercial range use practices and models that can help conserve energy.

Gas vs. Electric Energy Consumption

ENERGY STAR - Energy Saving Tips

ENERGY STAR is a program developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency. They help to protect our environment and help save businesses money via energy efficient machines. Commercial foodservice equipment that meets strict energy-saving standards can be ENERGY STAR certified. The ENERGY STAR program has not yet rated energy efficient commercial ranges but they do offer tips to make your commercial range more energy efficient:

  • The Induction Range

    The ENERGY STAR program suggests that induction ranges can be an alternative to a gas range top. Induction cooking includes controls that are accurate, highly efficient, rapid heating, and are considered low maintenance.

  • Video on How Induction Cooktops are Made from How It’s Made

  • Lids

    A lid can be used to keep heat in.

  • Idle Time

    Try to diminish the amount of idle time a range is on before you start using it.

  • Burner Maintenance

    Burners should be cleaned, inspected, and adjusted regularly for optimum efficiency.

  • Oven door maintenance

    Establishments should inspect gaskets and replace them if needed and tighten hinges regularly.

  • Oven Capacity

    Fully load the oven when cooking

  • Standing pilots

    Make sure to calibrate the standing pilot for optimum efficiency

  • Knobs

    If a knob is missing, replace it.

Commercial Range Knobs

Grateful acknowledgment to pixabay.com for the use of this photo

Conserving Energy with Different Commercial Ranges

Xcel Energy cautions against buying electric ranges and suggests saving one-third in energy costs by buying a natural gas range.

Xcel Energy does not recommend a gas range with a continuously burning pilot light (this consistently wastes gas and thus money) but articulates that a better alternative would be for consumers to buy natural gas ranges with electronic spark ignitions. Xcel Energy reports that this change can save as much as 30% in monthly energy costs. Although the cost in buying a gas range may be more upfront, overtime the energy savings will recoup the extra initial costs.

Energy Use Comparison

Don’t Waste Your Money with the Wrong Configuration

Commercial Range Configurations

Commercial ranges can be configured in many different ways. Commercial ranges come in different sizes. There is an array of different parts to add to a commercial range. A commercial range can have more or less burners, or grills, or griddles, and/or planchas instead of more burners, and different types of ovens, or storage, or even refrigeration instead of ovens. A commercial range consists of a top and a base.

We are grateful to Wikimedia.org for the use of this image.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6a/Restaurant_Kitchen.jpg

Commercial Range – Top Configurations:

A commercial range top is considered the top part of a range. Also written as commercial "range top," a rangetop is a stove. It is also known as a "range." A rangetop has different zones that heat up the cooking surface. A range top can be manufactured to use different heating methods. Commercial ranges can heat through induction, gas, and electricity. A commercial range can have raised burners or a flat smooth surface. A rangetop is not always found on top of an oven. A rangetop can be configured with these different components:

Commercial Range Top Options

Commercial Range Burners

A burner is a controlled area that heats up to cook food. Burners can be opened or closed. Depending on the size of the rangetop, a range might fit 0-12 burners. A burner head is where the burner flames comes out, there is a burner cap that covers it. There is usually a burner grate placed over the burner cap.

Commercial Range Hot Tops

A commercial range hot top is a flat cooking surface. Instead of specific zones getting hot, like for burners, this whole flat surface gets hot, though to different temperatures the closer you get to the center of the burner. You should use pots and pans on top of the hot top.

Commercial Range French Tops

A French top is another rangetop option. They are made of concentric, removable steel rings. There is a burner directly below the steel rings. You can remove or add rings to heat a pot or pan more or less, or even with a direct flame.

Range French Top

Thank you Wikimedia.org for the use of this photo.

Commercial Range Griddles

A griddle is a flat surface that you can cook food directly on. They can be grooved but are normally flat. They are often made out of steel but can be made out of other material.

Video on Cleaning your Griddle from Zack G

Commercial Range Charbroilers

A charbroiler is a common cooking tool. It is made up of grates or grills, and heated by either radiants, lava rocks and flames, or solid fuel, with the latter the least common. You can cook food directly on a charbroiler. Flames reach the food through the grates. Heat can be intense and direct. Charbroilers are commonly thought of when grilling things such as hamburgers.

Video on Cleaning Your Charbroiler from MrMagikitchn

Commercial Range Planchas

"A la plancha" means "grilled on a metal plate." A plancha is a flattop grill. You cook directly on top of a plancha. It looks similar to a griddle accept its heating source is circular instead of straight. The middle is the hottest area of the plancha while the outer edges are the coolest.

Commercial Range – Base Configurations:

The base of a range might be an oven, a storage cabinet, or a refrigerator. Depending on the width of the rangetop, the base can sometimes be doubled.

Commercial Range Base Options

Commercial Oven

An oven is a closed compartment or chamber used to cook, bake, heat, or roast food. The oven would be placed below the rangetop. Here are the different types of ovens:

Standard Oven

The standard oven is the modern oven known today. It is also called a conventional oven. It comes with 2 functions to heat food. To bake food you turn the oven on and the oven produces heat from the bottom of the oven. To broil food, you turn on the broiler and a flame appears inside at the top of the oven. The broiler can be used to melt food or to make the top of a dish crisp.

Convection Oven

A convection oven is like a standard oven except it has a fan inside of it. The fan in the oven is there to keep the air evenly circulating so that the item in the oven cooks evenly.

Creating Room to Stand in a Small Kitchen – Vast Space Savers

Space Saver Oven

A space saver oven is simply a narrower version of a standard oven. Space saver ovens can be useful in smaller, space limited, kitchens since they take up less space. Commercial space saver ovens can also come in handy when you want to bake smaller quantities of items at a different temperature than your main oven. Historically space saver ovens have not been able to accommodate full size pans and cookware. Today, manufacturers have been able to expand the size of the space saving ovens to accommodate full size cookware. They did this without eliminating the space saving qualities of a commercial space saver oven.

Commercial Cabinet Base

Instead of adding an oven underneath the rangetop, a storage cabinet can be used as a base instead.

Commercial Refrigerator Base

Refrigerators come in different sizes. There are refrigeration options for the bases of commercial ranges.

Commercial Salamander and Cheesemelter Configurations:

Some Commercial Range Configurations will have a Salamander or a Cheesemelter installed above the range.

Commercial Salamander

A salamander, also known as a salamander broiler, is a self-contained broiler unit. The salamander is used to brown the tops of dishes, broil meats (such as fish), or melt cheese. The heat comes from the top of the salamander to cook the top of the dish.

Commercial Cheesemelter

A cheesemelter is a type of broiler equipment. Cheesemelters use electricity or direct flame. A cheesemelter is similar to a toaster. Cheesemelters are normally long. Although it is closely related to the salamander broiler, you have more control to fine-tune the heat of a cheesemelter.

Dan Matlack shared his knowledge on purchasing the correct commercial range configuration: "The place you have to start in configuring a commercial range is knowing whether this will be the kitchen’s primary piece of cooking equipment or if it will be complementary to other pieces like griddles, charbroilers, and steam kettles. If it’s going to be a primary piece, you’ll need to make sure you work in the top options that the chef needs to build the menu. If they’ll be doing a lot of breakfast foods, we might direct them to a unit with a large flat top griddle. If they’re going to do a lot of stocks, sauces, or soups, and won’t have a steam kettle, we would recommend a configuration with several large burners or elements to accommodate stock pots. Knowing whether this will be primary or ancillary will also help us guide them on the sizing and power they’ll need. So, the conversation is really guided by, first, whether it’s a primary cooking piece and, second, what the menu is." Dan Matlack is KaTom’s Senior Product Specialist.

What to Pay for a Range?

The price of a commercial range can vary based on grade, power supply, configuration, and size. One can expect a commercial range to cost anywhere from about $1100 to about $10,000.

Video on How Ranges are Made from How It’s Made

Making Your Range Look Like New Again

Keeping your Commercial Ranges and Stainless Steel Appliances Clean

It is important to get rid of grease build up on commercial ranges to prevent food contamination, health hazards for employees, fire hazards, and damage to the commercial range.

Commercial Kitchen Configuration

Grateful acknowledgment to Farm6 and StaticFlickr.com for the use of this photo.

Cleaning a Commercial Range

Garland Group offers the following advice for "Maintaining and Cleaning" its commercial ranges. You should consult the instructions provided by your range's particular manufacturer.

Cleaning Commercial Range Open Top Burners:

  1. Spills can clog burner ports and damage the air to gas mixture. This can make your burner work inefficiently. Try to avoid splashing and spilling. Combat clogging burner ports by cleaning up spills as soon as they happen.
  2. Remove and wash the trays and grates daily.
  3. With a wire brush, clean the ports of the burners. Turn the burners on to verify there are no clogged ports.
  4. Use a Venturi brush to clean the inside and outside of a burner if there are clogged ports. Use a wire to clean the port. Wash the burner with hot water and soap if there is grease present. Dry the burner thoroughly and reinstall it properly.

Cleaning Commercial Range Oven Interior Made of Porcelain Enamel:

  1. Disconnect gas or power supply.
  2. Remove all racks. Clean the racks with mild soap and warm water. Some racks can be run through the dishwasher.
  3. Use oven cleaner to clean the inside of the oven. Follow the directions on the cleaning agent.

Cleaning Commercial Range Oven Interior Made of Standard Aluminized Steel:

  1. Disconnect gas or power supply.
  2. Standard aluminized steel is resistent to rusting. Clean spills the day they happen and clean the oven regularly.
  3. Remove the oven racks and guides. They may be cleaned with mild soap and warm water. Some racks can be run through the dishwasher.
  4. Apply a concentrated detergent onto a plastic pad. Scrub areas that have burned on materials. (Do not use steel wool, abrasive powders, or oven cleaner on your standard aluminized steel because it will deteriorate the aluminum.)

Video on How to Clean your Commercial Range from Appliance Reports

Things to do when cleaning the stainless steel on your commercial range:

  • Utilize clean water to rinse stainless steel surfaces
  • Clean with hot water
  • Clean with soap
  • Clean with mild detergent
  • Clean with ammonia
  • Clean stainless steel surfaces frequently
  • Use paper towels or a soft towel to dry the surfaces so no water spots are left behind
  • Clean stainless steel surfaces with a soft cloth
  • Clean stainless steel surfaces with a sponge
  • Clean stainless steel surfaces with a stainless steel scouring pad
  • If it is not highly polished stainless steel, you may use conventional scouring cleaners (but do so in the direction of the finish marks)
  • Definitely follow manufacturer's directions over anything else you read
  • Use protective gear when working with harsh cleaners (goggles, gloves, etc.)

Things to avoid when cleaning the stainless steel on your commercial range:

Video on Cleaning a Commercial Range and Other Kitchen Surfaces from ClearAdvantageClean

Keeping Your Range Ready for Heavy Use

Commercial Range Repair

When troubleshooting or repairing a commercial range remember to turn off the gas. Below are some of the more common issues that can occur when operating a commercial range.

Thermocouple

Huge thanks to LacancheService for the use of this image

Common Commercial Range Problems:

  • Pilot light won't stay lit
  • Oven light went out
  • Range will not function
  • Igniters will not function
  • Igniters spark but the burners will not light
  • Igniter sparks and lights but the flame is large, yellow, or distorted
  • Burner is continuously clicking, sparking sometimes, or not sparking at all
  • Oven is not getting hot enough
  • Oven is getting too hot
  • Oven Door is Crooked or Broken

Video on Commercial Range Repair – Burner Igniters, Oven Igniter, Spark Igniters, Knobs, Oven Light from Curtis Latson

Troubleshooting Common Commercial Range Problems:

Important note: We strongly recommend you trust a licensed and bonded commercial equipment repair person to reliably diagnose issues with your range and complete the appropriate repairs.

  1. What could be wrong with the commercial range if the pilot light won't stay lit?

    This might be the most common problem and it is usually a problem with the thermocouple. The problem is normally caused by the pilot light not directly hitting the thermocouple. The thermocouple needs direct heat from the pilot light to heat up enough to signal the safety valve to open. If the thermocouple never reaches the appropriate heat the pilot light will not stay lit and the safety valve will not open.

    If the pilot light is directly hitting the thermocouple but the pilot won't stay lit then you may have a damaged or defective thermocouple. If this is the case you need to replace the thermocouple. Additionally, this problem could be caused by a strong crossdraft being pulled through the rangetop.

    Video on Thermocouple Replacement from LacancheService

    If you replace the thermocouple and the same problem is still occurring you may have a problem with the safety valve.

    Shayne Lewton, President of Maintenance Chef, confirmed the above. He said that the most common part that fails in a commercial range is the thermocouple. He said it is an easy fix. He reported that thermocouple replacements cost $20 to $80, and about an hour of work. He estimates labor at about $75 an hour, plus a trip charge of about $25. He concluded that if the thermocouple was not the issue, then it is a safety value or a pilot light problem.

  2. What could be wrong with the commercial range if the oven light will not turn on?

    If the oven light will not turn, but the circuit breakers are fine and there is electricity going to the commercial range, there are a few common possible problems: the light bulb burned out, there is a problem with electrical wiring, or (if this model has one) maybe a fuse went bad. You either need to change the light bulb or the replace a fuse. These are the more easy fixes. A possible, more complicated problem source may be an electrical wiring issue.

    Video on Commercial Range Repair from Curtis Latson

  3. What could be wrong if the commercial range will not function?

    It is possible that the commercial range is not hooked up to the power source and/or gas. If the range is plugged in and (if applicable) hooked up to the gas source, there could be a problem with the wiring, fuses, or the circuit breaker.

  4. What could be wrong if the commercial range igniters will not function?

    If the commercial range igniters will not work the circuit may be tripped, a fuse may be blown, the igniter is damp, or the range may not be connected to the power source.

  5. What could be wrong if the commercial range igniter sparks but the burner will not light?

    This can happen if the gas supply has been interrupted. This can also happen if the pilot light went out, the thermocouple went bad, the safety valve needs to be replaced, or something else.

  6. What could be wrong if the commercial range igniter sparks and lights but the flame is large, yellow, or distorted?

    This will most likely happen if the burner port is clogged, the air shutters need to be readjusted, or the unit is hooked up to the incorrect kind of gas.

  7. Clogged Gas Burner

    Many thanks to Wikimedia for the use of this image.

  8. What could be wrong with the commercial range if the burner is continuously clicking and sparking, clicking and sparking sometimes, or not clicking and sparking at all?

    If the burner igniter is sparking and clicking constantly, one or more of the electrodes has probably shorted closed. This is sometimes caused by liquid getting into the ignition switch. A igniter can also continuously spark due to the power supply not being grounded, the power supply being reversed, or because the igniter is dirty and/or wet.

  9. Video on Igniter Clicking Issues from PatrickKruse1

    Video on Igniter Issue from LeeJiles

  10. What could be wrong with the commercial range if the oven is not getting hot enough?

    This is probably a thermostat issue. It could be that the thermostat needs to be recalibrated or replaced.

  11. What could be wrong with the commercial range if the oven is getting too hot?

    This too may be a thermostat issue. The thermostat may be defective and needs to be replaced or the thermostat needs to be recalibrated.

  12. What could be wrong with the commercial range if the oven door is crooked or broken off altogether?

    Michael Amandoli (the co-owner of Food Equipment Repair Service Inc.), a restaurant equipment repair company in Santa Rosa, California, explained that if a restaurant range is in a heavy traffic kitchen environment, the constant opening and closing of the heavy range oven door can lead to the hinges on the oven door bending or even breaking.

When to Stop Burning Cash in a Range Money Pit

Lewton, the President of a restaurant repair company in Westminster, Colorado, explained that when having a commercial range repaired it is important to ask yourself three questions:

  1. How old is this range?
  2. How much have you invested in the range for repairing it? And
  3. What will the new one cost?

Avoiding Range Downtime When You Get Slammed

Lewton recommends that if you are going to spend more than a third of the value of a range, then maybe it is time to get a new one. Lewton reported that Mom and Pop establishments that are real penny wise will put $300 towards repair costs one month and then $600 the next. It may be a 15-20 year old piece of equipment that they are just putting Band-Aids on. He said he believes they see the smaller repair costs as easier to swallow than purchasing a new range. On the other hand, with commercial outfits, if the range is starting to fail and they have made quite a few repairs, they just buy a new one. Range downtime is more expensive than the cost of the range. An example of this would be a bakery or somewhere that does pizzas, a pizza oven is mission critical to the business’ survival.

Video of Repair on a 15-20 Year Old Church Kitchen Commercial Range from Curtis Latson

Basic Tools needed to Repair Commercial Gas and Electric Ranges

These are the basic tools needed to repair equipment. You may need a different array of tools for more complex fixes.

Oven Thermometer

Thank you to Wikimedia.org for the use of this image.

  • Oven Thermometer
  • Silicone
  • Pipe Thread Sealant
  • Teflon Tape
  • Electrical Tape
  • High Temp Glass Cloth Tape
  • Hi-Temp Gas Valve Grease
  • Screws
  • Soap Solution
  • Screw Drivers (all kinds – flat, phillips, huge, tiny)
  • Needle Nose Pliers
  • Grip Type Pliers
  • Crescent Wrench
  • Flash Light
  • Allen Wrenches
  • Wire Strippers
  • Tape Measurer
  • Knife
  • Wrenches
  • Multi-Meter
Multimeter

Thank you to Wikimedia.org for the use of this image.

What is a Commercial Range Nameplate?

A nameplate on a commercial range is a tag that provides information about the range manufacturer’s name and contact info, details about your range, and specifications for the operation of the range. Commercial range nameplates used to be metal. Some manufacturers have started using foil, or other stickers, instead of metal tags on commercial ranges. A downside to using foil is that it can become damaged and hard to read or come off of the commercial range. Nameplates can be found on or near the door of the control panel, beneath the front of a burner, on the back of the commercial range, or another place.

Commercial Range Nameplate

Nameplates can contain some or all of the following data regarding your commercial range:

  • Manufacturer’s contact data
  • Model name or number
  • Serial number
  • Manufacturing date
  • Gas
  • Pressure
  • Amps
  • Volts
  • BTUs per hour

Who Manufactures Commercial Ranges?

Here is a list of some of the companies that manufacture commercial ranges:

Video on Commercial Range Burner Comparison from Appliance Reports

Commercial Range Installation Guides, Owner Manuals, and Parts and Service Manuals:

Here are a variety of different installation guides and manuals for a few commercial ranges, from an array of commercial range manufacturers.

American Range Commercial Range Installation Guide:

Professional Quality Cooking Equipment Owner’s Manual for Restaurant Series Ranges

http://www.americanrange.com/pdfs/manuals/AR-Ranges-Use-&-Care.pdf

Bakers Pride Commercial Range Installation Guide

http://www.bakerspride.com/manuals/Inst-Op/English/Open%20Burner%20Range%20Inst-Op%20U4192A%203-03.pdf

Cooking Performance Group Restaurant Range Series Manual

Applies to 23" Range with 4 Burners, 36" Range with 6 Burners, 60" Range with 10 Burners, 60" Range with 6 Burner Griddles, and 60" Range with 4 Burner Raised Griddles.

http://www.cookingperformancegroup.com/manuals/range.pdf

Garland Commercial Range Installation Guide:

Installation, Operating & Service Manual Master Series Heavy Duty Ranges, Fryers & Broilers

www.garland-group.com/asset/?id=dthcd

Imperial Commercial Range "Owners Manual, Installation, Operation, & Maintenance Instructions":

Heavy Duty (Industrial) Commercial Ranges and Oven – Gas

http://www.imperialrange.com/PDFs/hdManual.pdf

Restaurant Grade Commercial Gas Ranges and Ovens – Gas

http://www.imperialrange.com/PDFs/irManual.pdf

Commercial Electric Restaurant Ranges

http://www.imperialrange.com/PDFs/IRElectricManual.pdf

Market Forge Service Manual

"R Series Heavy Duty Range Parts and Service Manual"

http://www.mfii.com/images/pdf/MF-Range-parts.pdf

Saturn Equipment Operation Guide

Model Number SHDR60-10 – Gas range with oven Operation Manual

http://www.getsaturn.com/v/vspfiles/manuals/SHDR-60-10%20Operation%20Manual.pdf

Southbend

Platinum Rages:

Sectional Ranges (Platinum open tops, step-ups, hot tops, griddles, plancha, french tops, charbroilers, wood smoker)

http://southbendnc.com/downloads/manuals/Current/PlatinumSectional/1185836,REV8,PLATINUM,ENG,OWNERS,MANUAL.pdf

Sectional Ranges (Parts Manuals)

http://southbendnc.com/downloads/manuals/Current/PlatinumSectional/1199791,PARTS,REV0,PLATINUM,SERIES,RANGE.pdf

Heavy-Duty Restaurant Ranges:

S-Series Range Owners Manual

http://southbendnc.com/downloads/manuals/Current/Ranges/1191904,REV2,S-SERIES,ENG,OWNERS,MANUAL.pdf

S-Series Range Parts Manual

http://southbendnc.com/downloads/manuals/Current/Ranges/1199798,PARTS,REV2,S-SERIES,MANUAL.pdf

Electric Range Models:

Installation and Operations Manual

http://southbendnc.com/downloads/manuals/current/ranges/1189331%20Rev%200_web.pdf

SunFire Operations Guide

Installation and Operations Manual SunFire X Series Gas Restaurant Ranges

http://www.garland-group.com/docs/uploaded/gar/products/U_GMD_OM_SUNFIRERANGESXSERIES_4523343.pdf

Turbo Air Inc.

Radiance Restaurant Range Cut Sheet

http://www.turboairinc.com/index.php/lanotattachments/download/file/id/1119/store/3/targ-36-combi_3.pdf

Radiance Restaurant Range User Manual

http://www.turboairinc.com/index.php/lanotattachments/download/file/id/38/store/3/tar_3_3.pdf

U.S. Range

Instruction Manual, All 36E Series Ranges

http://www.garland-group.com/asset/?id=getmt

Viking

Guide to installing Viking commercial ranges

http://www.vikingrange.com/MEDIA_CustomProductCatalog/m20127_f20254.pdf

Specs Brochure for freestanding Viking commercial ranges

http://www.vikingcommercial.com/products/files/freestanding-ranges-rev-2-2010.pdf

Vulcan-Hart & Wolf Range Company

Vulcan Endurance / Wolf Challenger – Modular Series Gas Ranges: Owner's Manual

https://my.vulcanfeg.com/resourcecenter/vulcanwolfberkel/ProductDocumentation/F38201.pdf

Vulcan Endurance / Wolf Challenger – Modular Series Gas Restaurant Ranges: Installation and Operation Manual

https://my.vulcanfeg.com/resourcecenter/vulcanwolfberkel/ProductDocumentation/F45471.pdf

Commercial Range Hoods

Commercial Hood

Thankful acknowledgment to Farm3 and StaticFlickr.com for the use of this image.

What is a Commercial Range Hood?

A range hood, also known as an extractor hood or an exhaust hood, is a piece of equipment with a fan that is installed above a commercial range (aka commercial stove) or other commercial kitchen appliance. A hood is there to remove the heat, odiferous air, products of combustion, steam, grease that gets into the air, gas, fumes, and smoke. In many models, commercial range hoods will have a grease trap/filter for filtration of grease and other particles. Although there are some commercial range hoods that filter and then recirculate the air back into the kitchen, most vent hoods expel the air to outside the building.

Video on How a Range Hood is Made from How It’s Made https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OE_sR6QtHmk

Exhaust and Commercial Range Hoods

Exhaust is the "escape or release of vaporous waste material." When cooking, exhaust is created. Cooking can produce steam, odor, smoke, grease vapors or particles, moisture, and heat. Exhaust air is the air that was contaminated while cooking. An exhaust hood removes the exhaust air.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/83/Extractor_hood_with_turboswing_filters.jpg/300px-Extractor_hood_with_turboswing_filters.jpg

Help Avoid Severe Government Fines & Hazards Created by Improper Hood Types, Vents, and Installations

Types of Commercial Hoods

Hoods, also called ventilation hoods, are separated into two categories. Hoods are labeled as Type I or Type II hoods.

Type I Hoods

A Type I hood is supposed to be installed above appliances that produce grease and/or smoke vapors. These commercial ventilation hoods need a completely welded duct system. These hoods have grease filters.

What Should Type I Hoods be Constructed With?

Type I hoods should be made of (at a minimum) 0.0466 inch thick, 18 gage steel or at least 0.0335 inch thick, 20 MSG stainless steel.

What appliances should have Type I Hoods installed above them?

  • Ranges
  • Ovens
  • Smokers
  • Wok Ranges
  • Fryers
  • Griddles
  • Broilers
  • And other appliances that produce combustibles

Different Designs of Type I Hoods

  • Canopy Hoods
  • Wall Canopy Hoods
  • Single Island Hoods
  • Double Island Hoods
  • Proximity Hoods (Back shelf)
  • Flue Bypass Proximity Hoods
  • Eyebrow Hoods
  • Passover Hoods

Type II Hoods

A Type II hood is supposed to be installed above appliances that produce only moisture, steam, and/or heat. These can be both cooking or dishwashing appliances. They should NOT be installed over items that let off grease or smoke vapors (or anything else that lets off combustible products). A type II hood duct system does not need to be fully welded.

What Should Type II Hoods be Constructed With?

At a minimum, type II hoods should be made of 0.0296 inch thick, 22 gage steel, or at least 0.0220 inch thick, 24 MSG stainless steel, or at least 24 ounces per square foot of copper sheets.

What appliances should have Type II Hoods installed above them?

  • Steamers
  • Pasta Cookers
  • Dishwasher/Dishwashing Machines
  • And other appliances that produce steam, moisture, or heat

Different Designs of Type II Hoods

  • Canopy
  • Pant Leg Ducts

Commercial Hoods – To Vent or Not to Vent?

A hood can remove unwanted cooking exhaust products and possibly help avoid health and fire hazards. Some hoods are vented and some are ventless.

Ventilation Hood

Appreciative acknowledgment to Farm3 and StaticFlickr.com for the use of their photo.

Vented Hoods

Vented hoods take the unwanted cooking products from the kitchen and flow it through ducts to the outside of the building.

Replacement Air

Replacement air is also known as "makeup air. Vented hoods remove air from the building. When air is being removed, it must also be replaced in close to equal amounts.

Replacement air is needed for the following reasons:

  • Negative pressure can be caused by a lack of replacement air
  • The negative pressure from a lack of replacement air can cause cross drafts that are high velocity. High velocity cross drafts can displace contaminated air to other parts of the building, make hoods not work properly, make appliances not cook properly, and can contaminate cook surfaces.
  • The lack of replacement air created negative pressure. Negative pressure can also cause backdrafts from flues. This can make it so carbon monoxide is released into the air. This gas is highly toxic to humans.

Ventless Hoods

The ventless hoods filter/clean the kitchen air and then recirculate the same air back into the kitchen. These hoods can be less expensive to install because you do not need to install ducts that move the unwanted cooking exhaust outside. Ventless hoods are not options in some kitchens and for some appliances, due to laws and regulations in that state. Like other states, the state of California has specific rules regarding restaurants using ventless hoods.

What is a Commercial Range Hood Nameplate?

A commercial range hood nameplate holds the same purpose as the nameplate on the commercial range. The hood nameplate is there to provide pertinent data about the specifications and the manufacturer of your hood.

Commercial Hood Nameplate

The commercial hood nameplate will give you applicable data for your hood design, such as:

  • Maximum temperature for the rangetop below the hood
  • Minimum exhaust flow for air
  • AMPS
  • Whether or not there is internal thermal protection on the hood fan
  • Changing fusible links
  • Minimum clearance needed from the lower front edge of the hood to the rangetop
  • Changing the filters
  • Maximum supply flow for air
  • Minimum allowed overhang from the rangetop

Commercial Range Hood Installation

Before a commercial kitchen hood installation can be done, there is prep work that has to be completed at the site. Whether you're working with a fabrication company to produce a custom hood or you're putting in a pre-assembled hood, we strongly recommend that you trust appropriately licensed installers do the installation work.

Site Preparation for Commercial Hood Installations

  1. Plan out the precise area that the hood installation will take place. Make sure the area is clear of interferences that may inhibit correct installation.
  2. Confirm that overhead angels and overhead beams are tough enough to handle the weight of the hanging system for the hood. Before installation one may have to add to the existing structural beams to make it stronger.
  3. Verify that there is sufficient space to install the ductwork and hood with proper clearance from things that can combust.

Video on Restaurant Hood Installation from HRFP

Commercial Hood Installations Steps

Commercial hood models can vary. Hood installation instructions can also vary depending on your manufacturer and model.

  1. Get the hood into the area where it will be installed and take it out of the packaging.
  2. Decide what height the hood should be installed at
  3. If applicable, install the hoods back return
  4. If applicable, install the hoods bolt-together standoff
  5. If applicable, install the hood’s duct thermostats. Be sure to follow the correct instruction to do this correctly.
  6. Place the hood in its estimated final destination, but on the floor. Make sure the exhaust and supply risers are directly below the roof openings.
  7. If doable, weld the hood to the exhaust duct while it is on the floor
  8. Use the required size threaded rod for hood hanging. In the structural support, drill the required hole size so that it matches the hoods angle mounting brackets.
  9. The top hood hanger must be half an inch closer to the wall than the hood-mounting bracket. Note: Some hoods are meant for installation above a kitchen island and will not have a wall near it.
  10. While keeping the hood level, with equipment jacks or high lifts, lift the hood into the correct position and install the threaded rod (making sure to secure it with heavy duty hardware).
  11. Verify the hood is hung level. If not adjust it appropriately.
  12. If applicable, brace the ceiling joists and wall to the hood.
  13. If applicable, install back or side perforated supply plenums (according to their correct install instructions).
  14. If applicable, install the AC-PSP according to its correct install instructions.
  15. Now install the ductwork for the exhaust. The exhaust system needs to be liquid tight. Weld where necessary. The exhaust duct needs to be welded to the roof curb cap. The hood exhaust collar needs to be welded to the exhaust duct.
  16. Now the supply ductwork should be installed according to the correct manufacturer's instructions.
  17. If applicable, an electrician needs to install the control unit according to the correct field connections, following the wiring diagram.
  18. If applicable, a fire system installer (who is certified) should hook up the fire suppression system.
  19. If applicable, install the backsplash and end panels.
  20. If it is a hood against a wall, caulk the lower edge where the wall meets the commercial range hood.
  21. Now correctly install the hoods grease filters, grease cups, and light bulbs.

Commercial Range Hood Installation Cost

Commercial kitchen hood installation costs can vary by geographical region, company, hood type, and hood size. One can estimate that a commercial range hood install will end up costing somewhere in the ballpark of $1000 per linear foot of hood. Commercial hood installers might also charge travel fees.

Video on Roof mounted exhaust fan Installation from askme2buildit

Hood Safety Requirements and Inspections

Minimum safety distance between commercial range hoods, combustible building materials and exhaust ducts is determined by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA96), the International Mechanical Code (IMC), and local authorities. For most commercial range hood installations, this proper clearance is normally 18 inches for grease rated hoods (type 1). Most local authorities consider the specs and clearance permitted in the ELT listing from the company who manufactured the grease rated hoods (type 1) sufficient.

The National Fire Protection Association, at a minimum, requires all hood fire suppression systems to be inspected two times a year.

Commercial Range Hood Warranty

Many manufacturers have a 1 year warranty on their hoods however, if the hood is not installed by a qualified installer, if the hood is not installed per the manufacturer's instructions, or if the hood is not installed following local, state, and federal regulations and codes, the warranty can be considered null and void.

Help Avoid Grease Fires and Death with Efficient Hood Cleaning

Steps to Cleaning your Commercial Range Hood and Hood Filters

It is important to clean your commercial range hood to prevent fire and health hazards.

Video on What Occurs at a Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning? from DunWellLLC

Regular hood cleanings are often required by fire marshals, health inspectors, and insurance providers. Cleaning your hood regularly might: help your hood to be more efficient and work longer, help prevent kitchen exhaust disasters, or possibly get you a insurance rate reduction. To avoid the possibilities of damaging equipment or injury, we recommend you work with a professional trained in properly cleaning range hoods for this work.

Step #1:

As a safety precaution, make sure all appliances in the area are turned off and cooled. This includes fryers and pilot lights.

Step #2:

You do not want to contaminate your cooking or prep surfaces with grease and hood cleaners. To avoid this, wheel away equipment on wheels and lay tarps on top of surfaces, counters, and fryers that are stationary.

Step #3:

Follow the mixing ration instructions on your liquid degreaser.

Step #4:

Remove the accessories and drain the grease from the grease filter and grease pans and then use paper towels (or something else) to wipe the remaining debris from the pans and filters. Apply some of the degreaser onto the surface of the grease pans and grease filters and scrub them. Then put the grease pans and grease filters into hot water. Scrub them. Let the grease pans and grease filters soak while you clean the hood.

Step #5:

With a very wet scrub pad (use hot water), apply the liquid degreaser to the surface inside the hood and the piping. Scrub the surfaces, reapplying detergent when necessary.

Step #6:

Remove the detergent residue with paper towels and then repeat the liquid degreaser application.

Step #7:

Re-clean the hood and the piping surfaces with wet paper towels. Remove all the remaining grease and degreaser and then dry the hood and hood pipes with paper towels.

Step #8:

Return to the soaking grease filters and pans. Remove any remaining grease.

Step #9:

With clean water, rinse the grease filters and pans and lay them out to dry. Once they are dry you can reinstall the hood filters and pans.

Video on Cleaning a Commercial Kitchen Exhaust Vent from Commercial Vent & Grease Trap Cleaning

What are Hood Filters for Commercial Range Hoods Made of?

Hood filters can be made out of a variety of materials but are most likely to be made out of:

Commercial Range Hood Manufacturers

Some of the commercial kitchen hood manufacturers are: