Home Brewers Love Them but Who is Cornelius?

Ever wonder why this specific keg has such a unique name? It turns out the answer is pretty unimpressive. No, it’s not named for fancy royalty, it’s actually named for the company that once produced the vessels: Cornelius, Inc.

In the spirit of providing useful information beyond the single fact of where the name Cornelius came from, here are five more interesting facts about the Cornelius keg:

1. These kegs were originally used to store ready-to-drink soda. Today, they have almost all been replaced by bag-in-box systems.

2. For those companies that do still utilize the ready-to-drink system, the keg has the added benefit of not requiring specialized calibration of the syrup to carbonated water ratio.

3. The Cornelius keg is available with two kinds of heads: Pin lock and ball lock. The two are not interchangeable; however, you’re most likely to see the more common ball lock.

4. Historically, pin-lock kegs were reserved for Coca Cola products and Pepsi used ball lock heads.

5. Today, many home brewers use Cornelius kegs to store their home brews. This form of storage does require a kegerator but is viewed by many home brewers as more simplistic than individually filling multiple bottles.

Kegs at Highland Brewing

Kegs at Highland Brewing Company in Asheville, North Carolina

Chelsea B. Sanz
Chelsea B. Sanz

Chelsea Sanz has lived in East Tennessee since her family moved here from South Florida just before she started high school. While she initially begrudged her new home state, she eventually realized she had come to not only love it, but to “bleed orange” as University of Tennessee Volunteers fans here like to say. She and her boyfriend Hunter, a trail worker for Great Smoky Mountains National Park, enjoy exploring the nation’s most visited national park and coming up with their own farm-to-table recipes.

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  1. October 16, 2014 at 1:42 pm, The Salamander in Your Professional Kitchen - KaTom Blog said:

    […] more about tricky kitchen terms in our article on Cornelius Kegs and Monkey […]

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